LEVETIRACETAM 500 MG

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By Ghuman

Introduction

TABLETS (Levetiracetam) Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. • If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. • This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. • If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets are and what they are used for 2. Before you take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets 3. How to take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets 6. Further information 1. What Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets are and what they are used for Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets contain the active ingredient levetiracetam, which belongs to a group of medicines called antiepileptics. Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets are used to treat epilepsy in adults and children aged 6 years and above. Epilepsy is a condition where you have repeated seizures (fits). Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets are used on their own or in combination with other medicines to treat partial seizures with or without secondary generalisation. Partial seizures are seizures which affect only part of the brain. Secondary generalisation is when a partial seizure spreads to involve the whole brain. 2. Before you take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets Do not take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets if: • you are allergic (hypersensitive) to levetiracetam or any of the other ingredients of Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets (listed in section 6) • you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are planning to become pregnant. Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine. Taking other medicines Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. In particular, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following: • other medicines used to treat epilepsy (e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, primidone, valproic acid, lamotrigine, topiramate, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, tiagabine, vigabatrin, zonisamide) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. benzodiazepines) • medicines used to treat pain (e.g. opioids) • medicines used to treat infections (e.g. rifampicin, ciprofloxacin) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists) • medicines used to treat heart problems (e.g. digoxin, amiodarone) • medicines used to treat mental health problems (e.g. lithium) • medicines used to treat HIV infection (e.g. efavirenz) • medicines used to treat tuberculosis (e.g. rifampicin) • medicines used to treat fungal infections (e.g. fluconazole, itraconazole) • medicines used to treat cancer (e.g. imatinib, nilotinib) • medicines used to treat high cholesterol (e.g. statins) • medicines used to treat diabetes (e.g. insulin, metformin) • medicines used to treat thyroid problems (e.g. levothyroxine) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. levodopa) • medicines used to treat gout (e.g. allopurinol) • medicines used to treat asthma (e.g. salbutamol, theophylline) • medicines used to treat allergies (e.g. cetirizine, desloratadine) • medicines used to treat stomach problems (e.g. omeprazole, ranitidine) • medicines used to treat urinary problems (e.g. oxybutynin) • medicines used to treat muscle problems (e.g. tizanidine) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, primidone, valproic acid, lamotrigine, topiramate, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, tiagabine, vigabatrin, zonisamide) • medicines used to treat malaria (e.g. chloroquine, mefloquine) • medicines used to treat heartburn (e.g. ranitidine) • medicines used to treat hay fever (e.g. loratadine, cetirizine) • medicines used to treat arthritis (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. ramipril, losartan) • medicines used to treat HIV infection (e.g. ritonavir, atazanavir) • medicines used to treat tuberculosis (e.g. isoniazid, rifampicin) • medicines used to treat fungal infections (e.g. ketoconazole, fluconazole) • medicines used to treat cancer (e.g. tamoxifen, letrozole) • medicines used to treat high cholesterol (e.g. atorvastatin, simvastatin) • medicines used to treat diabetes (e.g. glimepiride, pioglitazone) • medicines used to treat thyroid problems (e.g. levothyroxine, liothyronine) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. selegiline, rasagiline) • medicines used to treat gout (e.g. colchicine, allopurinol) • medicines used to treat asthma (e.g. salmeterol, formoterol) • medicines used to treat allergies (e.g. desloratadine, fexofenadine) • medicines used to treat stomach problems (e.g. lansoprazole, pantoprazole) • medicines used to treat urinary problems (e.g. tolterodine, solifenacin) • medicines used to treat muscle problems (e.g. baclofen, dantrolene) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. clobazam, clonazepam) • medicines used to treat malaria (e.g. artemether, lumefantrine) • medicines used to treat heartburn (e.g. esomeprazole, omeprazole) • medicines used to treat hay fever (e.g. azelastine, mometasone). Taking Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets with food and drink You can take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets with or without food. Pregnancy and breast-feeding Do not take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets if you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are planning to become pregnant. Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine. If you are breast-feeding, talk to your doctor before taking this medicine. Driving and using machines Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets may make you feel sleepy or dizzy. If this happens, do not drive or use any tools or machines. Important information about some of the ingredients of Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets contain lactose. If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before taking this medicine. 3. How to take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets Always take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets exactly as your doctor has told you. You should check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. The usual dose is: Adults and children aged 6 years and above The usual starting dose is 500 mg twice a day. Your doctor may increase the dose gradually over a few weeks. The usual maintenance dose is between 1000 mg and 3000 mg a day, taken in two or three divided doses. Elderly The usual starting dose is 500 mg twice a day. Your doctor may increase the dose gradually over a few weeks. The usual maintenance dose is between 1000 mg and 3000 mg a day, taken in two or three divided doses. Patients with kidney problems If you have kidney problems, your doctor may reduce your dose. How to take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets Swallow the tablets whole with a drink of water. Do not chew the tablets. When to take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets Take your tablets at the same time each day. This will help you to remember to take them. If you forget to take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is nearly time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Do not take a double dose to make up for a forgotten dose. If you take more Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets than you should If you take more Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets than you should, talk to a doctor or go to a hospital straight away. Take the medicine pack with you. This is so the doctor knows what you have taken. Symptoms of an overdose may include: • drowsiness • confusion • agitation • aggression • difficulty breathing • coma. If you stop taking Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets Do not stop taking Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets unless your doctor tells you to. If you stop taking Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets suddenly, your seizures may get worse. If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. 4. Possible side effects Like all medicines, Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. Stop taking Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets and see a doctor straight away if you get any of the following serious side effects: • swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat which may cause difficulty in swallowing or breathing • severe skin reactions such as rash, itching, hives, peeling of the skin, blistering of the mouth, eyes or genitals • yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice) • signs of infection such as fever, sore throat or mouth ulcers • signs of a blood disorder such as bruising or bleeding more easily than normal • signs of liver problems such as loss of appetite, feeling sick, being sick, yellowing of the skin or eyes, dark urine, pale stools • signs of kidney problems such as passing less urine than normal, swelling of the ankles or feet • signs of an allergic reaction such as rash, itching or hives on the skin, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or other parts of the body, shortness of breath, wheezing or difficulty breathing. Other side effects include: Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people): • feeling sleepy • feeling dizzy • feeling weak • feeling unsteady • headache • feeling sick • being sick • diarrhoea • constipation • stomach pain • feeling tired • feeling anxious • feeling irritable • feeling depressed • difficulty sleeping • tremor • double vision • blurred vision • ringing in the ears • dry mouth • rash • itching • hair loss • weight gain • joint pain • back pain • muscle pain • difficulty concentrating • memory problems • confusion • agitation • aggression • hallucinations • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up • feeling dizzy when standing up

Uses

Uses

Levetiracetam (Keppra) is a prescription medication used to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. It is available in tablet, oral solution, and injectable forms. The recommended adult dose of levetiracetam is 500 mg twice daily. It is important to take levetiracetam exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Directions for Use

TABLETS Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine. • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. • If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. • This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their symptoms are the same as yours. • If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please tell your doctor or pharmacist. In this leaflet: 1. What Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets are and what they are used for 2. Before you take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets 3. How to take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets 4. Possible side effects 5. How to store Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets 6. Further information 1. WHAT LEVETIRACETAM 500 MG TABLETS ARE AND WHAT THEY ARE USED FOR Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets are used to treat epilepsy in adults, adolescents and children aged 6 years and above. Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets are used to treat partial seizures with or without secondary generalisation. 2. BEFORE YOU TAKE LEVETIRACETAM 500 MG TABLETS Do not take Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets: • if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to levetiracetam or any of the other ingredients of Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets (listed in section 6). Take special care with Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets: • if you have kidney problems. Your doctor may need to adjust the dose of Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets. • if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or are breast-feeding. Your doctor will discuss with you the possible risks and benefits of taking Levetiracetam 500 mg Tablets during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Taking other medicines Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without a prescription. In particular, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any of the following: • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. tricyclic antidepressants) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. benzodiazepines) • medicines used to treat pain (e.g. opioids) • medicines used to treat infections (e.g. rifampicin) • medicines used to treat mental illness (e.g. phenothiazines) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. beta-blockers) • medicines used to treat heart problems (e.g. digoxin) • medicines used to treat diabetes (e.g. insulin) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital) • medicines used to treat allergies (e.g. cetirizine) • medicines used to treat stomach problems (e.g. cimetidine) • medicines used to treat cancer (e.g. cyclophosphamide) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. ritonavir) • medicines used to treat fungal infections (e.g. fluconazole) • medicines used to treat high cholesterol (e.g. simvastatin) • medicines used to treat gout (e.g. allopurinol) • medicines used to treat asthma (e.g. salbutamol) • medicines used to treat thyroid problems (e.g. levothyroxine) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. levodopa) • medicines used to treat malaria (e.g. chloroquine) • medicines used to treat tuberculosis (e.g. isoniazid) • medicines used to treat heart rhythm problems (e.g. amiodarone) • medicines used to treat blood clots (e.g. warfarin) • medicines used to treat epilepsy (e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. lithium) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. clozapine) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. modafinil) • medicines used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (e.g. methylphenidate) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. sumatriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. baclofen) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. oxybutynin) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. loperamide) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. timolol) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. ribavirin) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. efavirenz) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. losartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. enalapril) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. amiodarone) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. valproic acid) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. fluoxetine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. buspirone) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. selegiline) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. olanzapine) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. quetiapine) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. armodafinil) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. ergotamine) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. tizanidine) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. tolterodine) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. alosetron) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. brinzolamide) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. peginterferon) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. atazanavir) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. valsartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. spironolactone) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. flecainide) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. topiramate) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. mirtazapine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. pregabalin) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. pramipexole) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. ziprasidone) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. aripiprazole) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. sodium oxybate) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. rizatriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. dantrolene) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. solifenacin) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. lubiprostone) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. latanoprost) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. simeprevir) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. darunavir) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. candesartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. bisoprolol) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. propafenone) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. clobazam) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. citalopram) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. gabapentin) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. ropinirole) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. paliperidone) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. lamotrigine) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. sodium oxybate) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. zolmitriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. diazepam) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. fesoterodine) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. alosetron) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. brimonidine) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. sofosbuvir) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. raltegravir) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. amlodipine) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. carvedilol) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. disopyramide) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. ethosuximide) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. venlafaxine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. lorazepam) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. entacapone) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. asenapine) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. valproic acid) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. modafinil) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. sumatriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. baclofen) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. oxybutynin) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. loperamide) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. timolol) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. ribavirin) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. efavirenz) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. losartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. enalapril) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. amiodarone) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. valproic acid) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. fluoxetine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. buspirone) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. selegiline) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. olanzapine) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. quetiapine) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. armodafinil) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. ergotamine) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. tizanidine) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. tolterodine) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. alosetron) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. brinzolamide) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. peginterferon) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. atazanavir) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. valsartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. spironolactone) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. flecainide) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. topiramate) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. mirtazapine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. pregabalin) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. pramipexole) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. ziprasidone) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. aripiprazole) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. sodium oxybate) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. rizatriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. dantrolene) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. solifenacin) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. lubiprostone) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. latanoprost) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. simeprevir) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. darunavir) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. candesartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. bisoprolol) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. propafenone) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. clobazam) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. citalopram) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. gabapentin) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. ropinirole) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. paliperidone) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. lamotrigine) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. sodium oxybate) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. zolmitriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. diazepam) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. fesoterodine) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. alosetron) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. brimonidine) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. sofosbuvir) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. raltegravir) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. amlodipine) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. carvedilol) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. disopyramide) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. ethosuximide) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. venlafaxine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. lorazepam) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. entacapone) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. asenapine) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. valproic acid) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. modafinil) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. sumatriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. baclofen) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. oxybutynin) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. loperamide) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. timolol) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. ribavirin) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. efavirenz) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. losartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. enalapril) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. amiodarone) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. valproic acid) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. fluoxetine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. buspirone) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. selegiline) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. olanzapine) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. quetiapine) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. armodafinil) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. ergotamine) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. tizanidine) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. tolterodine) • medicines used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (e.g. alosetron) • medicines used to treat glaucoma (e.g. brinzolamide) • medicines used to treat hepatitis C (e.g. peginterferon) • medicines used to treat HIV (e.g. atazanavir) • medicines used to treat high blood pressure (e.g. valsartan) • medicines used to treat heart failure (e.g. spironolactone) • medicines used to treat arrhythmias (e.g. flecainide) • medicines used to treat seizures (e.g. topiramate) • medicines used to treat depression (e.g. mirtazapine) • medicines used to treat anxiety (e.g. pregabalin) • medicines used to treat Parkinson’s disease (e.g. pramipexole) • medicines used to treat schizophrenia (e.g. ziprasidone) • medicines used to treat bipolar disorder (e.g. aripiprazole) • medicines used to treat narcolepsy (e.g. sodium oxybate) • medicines used to treat migraine (e.g. rizatriptan) • medicines used to treat muscle spasms (e.g. dantrolene) • medicines used to treat urinary incontinence (e.g. sol

Storage

Levetiracetam 500 mg should be stored at room temperature, between 15-30°C (59-86°F). It should be kept away from light, moisture, and heat.

Treatment

TABLET

Levetiracetam is an anticonvulsant medication used to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. It is available as a generic medication and is sold under the brand name Keppra. The usual adult dose is 500 mg twice daily. It is taken by mouth. Common side effects include sleepiness, headache, and irritability. Serious side effects may include an increased risk of suicide, anemia, and allergic reactions.

Benefits

TABLET

Levetiracetam 500 mg tablet is a medication used to treat seizures in people with epilepsy. It is also used to treat myoclonic seizures in people with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in the brain. The benefits of taking levetiracetam 500 mg tablet include:

1. Decreased frequency and severity of seizures: Levetiracetam 500 mg tablet can help reduce the frequency and severity of seizures in people with epilepsy.

2. Improved quality of life: Taking levetiracetam 500 mg tablet can help improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy by reducing the frequency and severity of seizures.

3. Reduced risk of side effects: Levetiracetam 500 mg tablet has fewer side effects than other antiepileptic drugs, making it a safer option for people with epilepsy.

4. Improved cognitive functioning: Levetiracetam 500 mg tablet can help improve cognitive functioning in people with epilepsy, which can lead to improved quality of life.

5. Reduced risk of sudden death: Taking levetiracetam 500 mg tablet can reduce the risk of sudden death in people with epilepsy.

Side Effects

Common side effects of levetiracetam 500 mg include:

1. Dizziness
2. Headache
3. Fatigue
4. Nausea
5. Vomiting
6. Diarrhea
7. Loss of appetite
8. Weight gain
9. Irritability
10. Anxiety
11. Tremors
12. Sleep disturbances
13. Abnormal behavior
14. Memory problems
15. Difficulty concentrating
16. Blurred vision
17. Rash
18. Joint pain
19. Abdominal pain
20. Increased thirst

Precautions and Warnings

Levetiracetam 500 mg is a prescription medication used to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Common side effects of levetiracetam 500 mg include dizziness, drowsiness, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Tell your doctor if these side effects are severe or do not go away.

Before taking levetiracetam 500 mg, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, a history of depression or suicidal thoughts, or if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how levetiracetam 500 mg affects you.

Do not stop taking levetiracetam 500 mg without talking to your doctor first. Suddenly stopping this medication can cause serious side effects.

Do not take levetiracetam 500 mg if you are allergic to it or any of its ingredients.

Tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

It is important to tell your doctor if you are taking any other medications that can cause drowsiness, such as sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and certain antidepressants.

Do not drink alcohol while taking levetiracetam 500 mg. Alcohol can increase the risk of side effects.

If you experience any signs of an allergic reaction, such as hives, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat, seek medical attention immediately.

How Does It Work?

Levetiracetam (Keppra) is an anticonvulsant medication used to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. It works by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain. The usual adult dose of levetiracetam is 500 mg twice daily. It is usually taken with food. Common side effects of levetiracetam include dizziness, drowsiness, headache, and nausea.

advice

Safety Advice

pregnancy

Pregnancy

Q: Can I take during pregnancy?

It is not recommended to take levetiracetam during pregnancy without consulting your doctor first. Levetiracetam has been classified as a pregnancy category C drug, which means that it may cause harm to an unborn baby. Therefore, it is important to discuss the risks and benefits of taking levetiracetam with your doctor before taking it during pregnancy.

feeding

Breast Feeding

Can I take while breastfeeding?

It is not recommended to take Levetiracetam while breastfeeding. You should consult your doctor before taking any medication while breastfeeding.

alcohol

Alcohol

Can I consume alcohol with?

No, it is not recommended to consume alcohol while taking Levetiracetam 500 mg. Alcohol can increase the risk of side effects such as drowsiness, dizziness, and confusion. It can also increase the risk of seizures.

driving

Driving

Can I drive if I have consumed?

No, you should not drive if you have consumed Levetiracetam 500 mg. Levetiracetam can cause drowsiness, dizziness, and blurred vision, which can impair your ability to drive safely.

(FAQs)

Q: What is levetiracetam 500 mg used for?
A: Levetiracetam 500 mg is used to treat certain types of seizures in adults and children who are at least 1 month old. It is also used to treat myoclonic seizures in adults and children who are at least 12 years old, and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in adults and children who are at least 6 years old.

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